This article continues exploration of typescript type system applications. Previous articles on pragmatic uses of ad-hoc typing and mapped types showcased type system usages for application developers. This one will go a bit deeper, and is more useful for library developers. Make sure you fully understand concepts explained previously.

Generic classes in C# and Java can be thought of as class templates, which let us use placeholders instead of certain types. What they don't allow is having generic property names. Typescript does not have such limitation and easily lets us do that:

export type MakeProp<TKey extends string , TType> = {
  [key in TKey]: TType
}

// MakeProp<'foo', number>
type equivalent1 = {
    foo: number;
}
TS playground

This does not look so impressive, after all, we could have written this type by hand just as easily. What we should know, however, is that we have passed they type-key barrier ( not a real term :-) ) - we managed to make type into a key and create an object shape using only other types. This means, we can use our 'MakeProp' type within other generic types in Typescript. With mapped and conditional types, this means we can construct much more complex types with our mappings.